KATALIN LADIK

KATALIN LADIK

KATALIN LADIK (b. 1942, Novi Sad, Yugoslavia) is a Hungarian poet, performance artist, actress and visual artist. Before 1992 she lived and worked in Novi Sad and since then she has alternately lived in Budapest, Hungary and on the island of Hvar, Croatia. Her oeuvre includes written, sound and visual poetry; visual art, concept photography, performance art; happenings; mail art; experimental music; theatre, film, and radio plays. The majority of her performances are in-between performance art and theatre. She presents her sound poetry accompanied by body art actions, vocal, and gestural improvisation. Her first works of poetry were published in 1962 in the literary magazines Híd (Bridge) and Symposion. She was a member of the neo-avant-garde literary group “Új Symposion” (New Symposion) in Novi Sad. She became widely known through her surreal and erotic poems. Twelve of her poetry volumes were published in her native language in Yugoslavia and Hungary and in translation in Serbian, Croatian, English and French. Her poems also appeared in various magazines and anthologies worldwide, translated into English, Spanish, German, Italian, Polish, Bulgarian, Slovakian, Hindi, Chinese, Indonesian, Romanian, Macedonian, Rusyn, and Slovenian. Her autobiographic novel entitled Élhetek az arcodon? (Can I Live on Your Face?) was published in 2007. As an actress of the Novi Sad Theatre, she acted in many dramatic roles on the local stage and worked over the years with directors such as Miklós Jancsó, György Harag, Lordan Zafranović and Peter Strickland. Katalin Ladik has been invited to numerous international poetry festivals, in Paris, Amsterdam, New York, Milan, Bratislava, Marseille, Limassol (Cyprus), Belgrade, Cluj and Berlin. She recently gave a master class in free improvisation at the Music Academy of Basel (Switzerland). Her visual poetry works can be found in the collections of major international museums: Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York; Tate Gallery in London; Ludwig Museum – Museum of Contemporary Art, Budapest; Kontakt Collection of Erste Bank Group and the Art Collection Sammlung Verbund in Vienna; Museum Sztuki, Lodz and the Museum of Contemporary Art (MACBA) in Barcelona.

Iugoslavia